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Clothespin X-Ray

  • Motor Practice
  • Science & STEM
  • Spelling
  • Preschool
  • Kindergarten
  • Grades 4-5
  • Grades 1-3

Craft this X-ray craft and explore your clothespin people inside and out! 

Materials



1 Clothespin (Per X-Ray)
Craft Foam
Acrylic Paint
Paintbrush

Scissors

Glue or *Hot Glue* Adult Supervision Required (Optional)

Instructions



Step  1.

Paint your clothespin people any way you’d like! 

Step  1.

Paint your clothespin people any way you’d like! 

Step  2.

Paint shirts and pants on your people. 

Step  2.

Paint shirts and pants on your people. 

Step  3.

Cut 2 squares out of craft foam to make your X-ray machines.

  • TIP: Any color will work, but if you have black foam, use that!

Step  3.

Cut 2 squares out of craft foam to make your X-ray machines.

  • TIP: Any color will work, but if you have black foam, use that!

Step  4.

If your craft foam is not black, paint it!

Step  4.

If your craft foam is not black, paint it!

Step  5.

Use white paint to draw on an X-Ray Skeleton!

Step  5.

Use white paint to draw on an X-Ray Skeleton!

Step  6.

Add your X-Ray on top of your people to show off their bones inside! You can glue the X-Ray on, or leave it separate to take on and off for a fun illusion!

Step  6.

Add your X-Ray on top of your people to show off their bones inside! You can glue the X-Ray on, or leave it separate to take on and off for a fun illusion!

Examine the letter ‘X’ inside and out with this clothespin craft while observing what it means to be a radiologist!  

  • The Big Picture: ‘X’ is an uncommon letter in the English language, but still a very helpful one. Help your students think of words that include this letter and practice pronouncing them. What kind of sound does it make?
  • X-cellent Fine Motor Skills: If a doctor took an X-ray of your students’ crafting hands, they would see strong muscles forming! Keep strengthening those fine motor skills by gluing, pinching clothespins, and cutting foam.

Doctors use X-ray machines to take pictures of the inside of a patient’s body to find what’s hurt them. These medical machines can look big and scary — but they are helpful tools! Do any of your students want to be doctors or radiologists? Let the University of Virginia explain how an X-ray works with their kid-friendly blog post to inspire the future healthcare workers in your classroom!